Sweden: 3 cities, grey skies, and a shipload of sins

Hello there, everyone! Doing fine? Now as for me, the semester at university has started again and there was only one possible way to face that: Go on holidays! (To the country which, according to many Americans I have met, is exactly the same thing as Switzerland: Sweden.) And now, after a short encounter with winter winds, tons of sweets and pastry, I am back home and I guess there is no more running away from being a serious academic no more. Yet, what’s the first thing I do? Talk to you guys, of course!

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Now, let me get two things straight: First of all, don’t got to the south of Sweden in winter in times of climate change, when what used to be snow becomes rain and what used to be ice-crystal-cold becomes humid bleakness. Secondly, don’t plan to visit three Swedish cities in 6 days, or don’t plan to drive over 650 kilometers in 6 days. You will end up saying “Wow, I imagine this city must be really cool, it’s a pity we have to leave already again” all the damn time. Should have known better? Yes. But! I got to see a lot of lovely cafés thanks to that one fact that made me tell you not to go to Sweden in winter. The weather was mostly awful. A cosy 5 degrees and drizzly rain, topped with brisk wind, changing for thick snow up in pretty Stockholm. Should have known that one better as well? Yes. Anyways, it’s kinda good for you people, because I found some really warm and cosy gems up there that made everything seem very heartwarming and sweet again and that I absolutely wanna share with you.

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Now, my first stop was that city with the cute name (true: my family used to name our plush toys after it): Malmö. In a nutshell, a really easy going city. No fancy or thrilling sites, though, but that is actually what I really appreciated. For it meant that there weren’t that many tourists and I did not feel like rushing from one attraction to another. Now, one of the first things that stroke me, was that every single bakery not only had tons of cinnamon buns (I had expected those), but also tons of brownish balls, rolled in coconut rasps. I tried one (as I do with everything that is edible) and, honestly, I fell in love.

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Fun fact: In Sweden, the official day to eat sweets for kids is mostly Saturday. The only sweet that is allowed on weekdays is the aforesaid chocolate ball. However, I don’t really understand that, most of the time, that nasty thing basically consists of butter. Lot’s of butter. That is why I particularly fancied the one of a small café I visited, for it was vegan and no less yummy than the other ones. The Lite Off Salladsbar, by the way, also has some pretty awesome baristas.

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And I am over here working in my bar like, “your Cappuccino-foam does look a tiny little bit like a heart, tho?!”

So on the the next stop: Växjö, self-claimed greenest city in Europe and home of many students. Well, in winter it looks pretty brownish, to be frank. But what doesn’t? We stayed a little outside the city in a small hotel by a lake, and let me tell you that: Go there! Their in-house bakery and their breakfast or afternoon tea (Fika in Swedish) are well worth a quick stop-over: Toftastrand Hotell. Pure dolce vita!  

After that short intermezzo, I made my way a many kilometers further north: to Sweden’s charming capital city. Landscapes changed gradually, so did climate. The only opportunities to eat on the way were three different, equally globalized, fast-food chains. Blessed be the generous breakfast, again!

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Now, in summer Stockholm might very well become one of my absolute favorite cities. There is something relaxed and welcoming about that city. Winter, however, was brisk (except for the one evening most of my pictures were taken on – classic). Other than that, I was gifted with tons of snow and icy winds which made me start the cinnamon-bun competition: Where do I get the best ones? I can tell you one thing: there is an odds-on favorite for sure: the Fabrique. Okay, it’s a chain, but really, I have never had such a nastily delicious and deliciously nasty cinnamon bun in my whole life.

The other challenge that was going on was: how to eat inexpensive and tasty simultaneously. After days of roaming around, I accidentally ran into the most charming and heartwarming little café one possibly wish for: Bistro Matgatan 22. They serve a great selection of vegan as well as non-vegan lunches, with free salad, bread and lemonade for more than fair prices in a living-room-ish atmosphere. Awesome. And last but not least, in the very same street in Gamla Stan, Stockholm’s old town (yes, it is mostly as touristic as it sounds), I found a vegan and organic bakery with all the nasty pastry they sell everywhere but with the awesome difference that it is dairy- and sugar-free. How cool is that? Go to: Naturbageriet Sativa.

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Now, after all those treats you might imagine that I felt pretty much like going cold turkey when I came home. And as I am also opting for a vegan nutrition at the moment, what I did was an attempt at my one true love, Swedish chocolate balls, vegan edition. Here you go:

vegan Swedish chocolate balls

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ingredients:

  • 500 g date paste
  • 200 g dark chocolate
  • 1 cup oats
  • 1 cup hashed and roasted almonds
  • 1/4 cup raw cacao powder
  • 4 tablespoons flax-seed oil
  • coconut flour or coconut rasps

preparation:

  1. melt chocolate with flax-seed oil
  2. mix all ingredients and knead well
  3. form balls, roll in coconut rasps and put in the fridge for an hour
  4. enjoy with chai latte or coffee

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I wish you some sweet days, my dear fellows and a lovely beginning of spring

Sincerely, your professional chocolate-ball-addict

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